NPCA’s Wedding Wednesdays

Did you know that the NPCA collects and publishes Peace Corps wedding stories? In fact, in 2015, LGBT RPCV made a concerted effort to make sure there was more same-sex couple representation in the album. We are proud to say that the inaugural same-sex couple is still the holder of the most amount of Likes! CLICK HERE to view the full album on Facebook. Are you interested in submitting your own? Copied below are the instructions:

Send a photo of your #peacecorps wedding, plus a BRIEF caption/story (Ideas: How you met? About the wedding? What’s distinctively “Peace Corps” about you two?), to news@peacecorpsconnect.org and include the word “Wedding” in the subject line. Include only as much personal information as you feel comfortable sharing with the internet. We’ll let you know when it’s posted and you can choose to “tag” it at that time. What qualifies as a “Peace Corps wedding?” You got married while in the Peace Corps, met in the Peace Corps and got married afterwards, or are RPCVs who met and married after service. Marrying a host country national or a member of another international service organization (ex. CUSO, VSO) “counts,” of course. Peace Corps: making peace one person at a time.

Below are few that we’d like to highlight:

 

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Posted June 10, 2015: Norbert (Ivorian) + Phillip (American, RPCV Guinea & Burkina Faso 2009-2011). Met in Ouagadougou, August 2010. Marriage ceremony in Abidjan, July 2011. Officially married in New York, August 2011. “Norbert and I met through friends of friends, dancing at a nightclub in Ouagadougou. We hit it off right away and have been together ever since” – Phillip

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Posted November 30, 2016: Marisa (Education 2011-13) and Fiona (Agriculture 2010-12) met during Peace Corps service in Paraguay. They shared the following: “We proud to say we got married on July 9, 2016, in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, a year after marriage equality reached the U.S. Our wedding clearly reflected our experiences as LGBTQ Americans and Paraguay RPCVs – including tereré (ice cold mate tea) and ñanduti (Paraguayan lace). There were 4 RPCVs in the wedding party, and 13 RPCVs in attendance (representing 4 countries and 2 decades)

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Posted November 30, 2016: Betsie, pictured right, and Shay met during service in Ecuador (2014-2016). “We were the two in our omnibus vehemently opposed to finding new relationships in Peace Corps. We signed up to service, not to fall in love. We fell for each other and the rest is recent history. We’re married, adjusting to life back in the U.S. and looking forward to a life together full of adventure”

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Posted December 21, 2016: Sarah Bender and Stephanie Hubbell met while serving together in Jordan (2009-2011). Sarah says that “It was until the end of our service that we realized true love had been right in front of us, but once that happened we never looked back. We married in New York City on September 4, 2016. We were lucky to get to share our wedding celebration with many members of our RPCV Jordan family and would not have had it any other way. We look forward to serving again one day, together as wives!”

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Posted December 28, 2016: Together for 26 years and married for 3, Ronald Hemmer (Thailand 82-84) and Franklin “Dan” Davis (Colombia 66-68) met in Phoenix, Arizona were Ron worked for the USDA and Dan worked for the Arizona DOT. Being RPCVs, as well as being from Ohio, led to the initial friendship. “As it turns out, most of our long-term friends are RPCVs. Shared values led to lasting friendships. Here we are with our Thai gold weddings in Palm Springs were we are living at the time”. 

 

 

 

 

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Freedom To Marry Movie

Click image to find a screening near you

The Freedom To Marry is the behind-the-scenes story of the architects of this historic civil rights movement and the brilliant, nerve-wracking campaign to win same sex marriage throughout the United States. The nail-biting, untold story of how same-sex marriage became law of the land. The Freedom To Marry  follows RPCV Evan Wolfson (Togo 1978-1980), the architect of the movement, civil rights attorney Mary Bonauto and their key colleagues on this decades long battle, culminating in a dramatic fight at the United States Supreme Court. More than the saga of one movement’s history, this is an inspiring tale of how regular people can change the world.

CLICK HERE to find a screening near you.

Evan Wolfson biography:
Wolfson is known as the national architect of the same-sex marriage movement. Having written his third year thesis paper at Harvard Law in 1983 on the subject, Wolfson began advocating for the freedom to marry when almost every gay rights leader was adverse. People thought he was ‘crazy’, and that he was seriously overreaching. After AIDS ravaged the LGBT community, and the need for legal protections became clear, Wolfson (as an attorney at Lambda Legal Aid) renewed his push for marriage. He claimed not only that same sex marriage could only become a legal reality, but that by working towards that goal, LGBT Americans could improve their status on a huge host of other fronts.

National Coordinator, Manuel Colón, and Evan Wolfson at a screening of The Freedom to Marry in Santa Monica, CA

In the early 1990s, Wolfson helped fight the first successful legal marriage court battle, in Hawaii. As the movement began to gain traction, he founded, Freedom to Marry, a not-for-profit which spearheaded the strategy and the national campaign. His genius came from an acute understanding of history, and other civil rights campaigns. His catch-phrases like, “wins trump losses”, and “there is no marriage without engagement” underpinned what soon become a national and international movement.

Evan was first to understand that, while marriage battles could be won in court, it would require changing the ideology of the nation – helping non-gay people understand that gays and lesbians were ‘people too’ – to make ‘wins’ happen, and to make them stick.

As he predicted, his early efforts were met with intense opposition from the masses, the Church and even the White House. Unperturbed, Wolfson helped devise and implement a cohesive strategy that included public education, grassroots mobilization, PR, polling, messaging, fundraising, social media campaigns and carefully orchestrated legal efforts. Evan, himself, spent decades criss-crossing America, speaking at every event, large and small, guiding and leading the campaign to win hearts, minds and victories. These efforts led to his eventual moniker, Mr. Marriage.

Wolfson began working on the marriage movement, there was not a single town in America where gay people had even a shred of legal protection. As of this writing, gay marriage is now legal not only throughout America, but in 22 other countries on five continents.

Ironically, having fought the government for decades and won, ironically, Wolfson eventually put himself out of business. Having achieved his organization’s stated mission, he happily closed Freedom to Marry in December, 2015. His staff (with this remarkable victory on their resume) has gone on to key positions at other LBGT and civil rights organizations throughout the United States.

After a short vacation, Evan returned to New York, where he resides with his husband, Cheng He. He has become extremely active in a variety of other campaigns for social justice (including LGBT anti-discrimination) not only in this country, but around the world. Interestingly, much of his current work is now currently sponsored by the US State Department, which has requested Evan to provide his expertise to other nations currently embarking on same sex marriage battles.