Return to Paraguay

– Manuel Colón, RPCV 2010-2012

2014 has been a big year for me in terms of reflection and introspection, largely because of a few life “shifts” that I’m currently in. Specifically, as of May, I have spent more time out of college then the four years that I have spent in it. Additionally, at the end of year, I’ll have passed the mark 27 months from my close of service (COS) from Peace Corps – more time NOT being a PCV than the time served as a Volunteer.

It’s interesting to think of how quickly two years after Peace Corps seems like it flew by so quickly, however the 27 moths of service seem as slow as molasses. Many people keep asking how my trip was and the best way I can describe it is as such – it was strange at how comfortable it all felt. That is, I felt so at ease and able to just jump into daily life and culture. I still remembered street names and bus lines and where to get on and off to transfer (with just one mishap). However, there were obvious changes and differences.

There is new leadership in the Peace Corps office, businesses were closed and/or moved, there was new development in the downtown area, and obvious upgrades to certain green spaces around the country, etc. On the topic of transition, the timing for the visit was just perfect. I was able to go to the swear-in ceremony of the newest training group. In fact, it was the group that was replacing the group that replaced my group – very meta. It was great to speak with the Volunteers nearing COS, who were just green trainees when I was there, and hear their experience with their community and their successes (or failures) with their projects. On the flip side, it was rejuvenating to hear from the newly sworn-in Volunteers about their hope for site and expectations of their future projects. As dynamic and idiosyncratic as the Peace Corps experience, there are always some common threads that persist.

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Manuel with friend, Cristhian Fretes, who was a counterpart on his Paraguay Verde project and currently works for a Peace Corps as a Technical Trainer.

In fact, I actually got to meet and speak with some of the Volunteers who are carrying on some of the projects that I started. I imagine that it’s every RPCV’s hope that their projects continue and make meaningful impacts, so it was refreshing to actually meet with the people that are making that a reality for projects that I had a hand in. And this is just thinking about “work” stuff! One of the Volunteers I met with wanted to work on a comprehensive Ally Training for PCVs and Staff. What started out a simple chat between her and I somehow evolved to an impromptu business meeting with the Director of Training and the Country Director. It was so nice to hear their support of the training and their personal commitments to diversity and creating an inclusive environment for LGBTQ Volunteers. I took advantage of the influence in the room to ask their thoughts on if they envision Paraguay ever being a host country for same-sex couples. We collectively agreed that it likely be a tough decision to move forward with, but a worthwhile one to considering exploring seriously.

Paraguayan hospitality is one that I think is rivaled in very few places. I had forgotten that one of my main contact’s wife works at the airport. So, imagine my surprise when, after landing, before even going through customs, I see a familiar face awaiting my arrival. She helped us collect our luggage and even negotiate the taxi fare into the city. My host family had a room prepared and waiting for me, still remembered all my random quirks about morning rituals, and cooked all my favorite meals. My community contacts welcomed me with open arms, ushering me into the Mayor’s office to announce my return, and setting up a barbeque to recount all the updates and progress of the town.

All in all, it was great visit and I can’t wait to go back again!

You can contact the writer at macolon2@gmail.com

 

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About LGBT RPCV
We are an organization of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people and others who are Peace Corps volunteer alumni, current volunteers, former and current staff members and friends. Founded in Washington D.C. in 1991, we have several hundred members throughout the country and around the world who have served in Peace Corps since its beginning in 1961. We're made up of a national steering committee, together with regional chapters. We are an active affiliate member of the National Peace Corps Association.

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