The Boatman: An Indian Love Story

-John Burbidge (, author.

Although I was not a member of the Peace Corps, I have a strong affinity for it since I have lived in the US for 27 years, am married to an American, and belonged to an organization whose work paralleled the Peace Corps in many ways.

The Boatman: An Indian Love Story is a memoir of the six years I spent working as a volunteer with an international NGO in India and my coming out as a gay man in that society. It describes my roller-coaster journey of sexual adventuring while living in a tightly knit community and playing a public relations role for the organization, and the delicate balancing act this called for.

The Boatman took 13 years to write and its publication in India in February last year was most timely. Shortly before I arrived in New Delhi for its launch, the Indian Supreme Court reinstated a law criminalizing homosexuality that had been repealed by the Delhi High Court four years before. One of the main justifications for this action was that the law only affected a minuscule portion of the population. In the words of one journalist, “The Boatman provides a much-needed reality check of that view.”

A new edition of the book with an afterword that places it in the context of the current Indian political situation has recently been released. It is available from as a print and e-book.

For RPCVs in the Seattle area, I will be doing a reading at the University Bookstore in the U District on September 18th at 7:00PM. I would love to meet you there. CLICK HERE for more information.

Details of all events are on the book’s Facebook page –
More information about The Boatman is at

The Boatman

Uganda Comes to Albany – a Book Review

– Mike Learned, RPCV, Malawi

 Dick Lipez is a RPCV, Ethiopia, former DC Peace Corps staff, longtime journalist and editorial writer, and keen observer of the political, social, and human rights issues that affect LGBT people around the world. He has just 41FtLSQy1gL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_published the fourteenth mystery in his Donald Strachey series, Why Stop at Vengeance. His first, On the Other Hand, Death, was published 34 years ago. His protagonist/hero Strachey is an Albany, NY private eye in a longtime relationship with Timothy Callahan, who had been a Peace Corps Volunteer in India prior to their relationship. Peace Corps values, experiences, insights crop up in almost all the books in the series. Timothy offers good advice and asks incisive often challenging questions. He’s that voice in the back of Strachey’s head keeping him on the proper path.

Lipez, writing as Richard Stevenson, actually Dick’s first and middle names has had his finger on the wide range of critical issues facing his LGBT brothers and sisters for the last three decades. Dick reflects these in his own life with his husband Joe, and Strachey and Tim have taken it all on,

This latest volume tackles the rabid homophobia that many Peace Corps Volunteers, straight and gay, face in many, many countries throughout Africa. In this case the setting is in Uganda, a country where 154 PCVs currently serve; 1405 volunteers since 1964. Strachey is contacted by a gay Ugandan refugee in Albany who wants vengeance against a conservative American minister who has preached the demonization of LGBT people in Uganda, and is involved in questionable transactions with corrupt Ugandan politicians who support the vile homophobic laws and agendas. The corrupt politicians, the manipulative American ministers, DC lobbyists; all have their hands in the till.

One of  Lipez’s (Stevenson’s) strengths as a writer is his wide read understanding of  what is behind so many of the human rights struggles in much of  developing world, much of it the developing world where PCVs serve. Although Lipez (Stevenson) in an Author’s Note says that although fiction, but the involvement of American missionaries and other clergy in anti-gay crusades in Africa and Eastern Europe is all too real.

Much of the books description of  the  raw, violent homophobic rhetoric of Ugandan politicians can be difficult to read, but it’s exactly what has been promulgated in that beautiful East African country in recent years. Lipez (Stevenson) rightly ties this rhetoric to the corrupt, long lasting political and social elites who want to keep hold of political and economic power in some of the world’s poorest countries. They sell homophobia as an answer to the problems of the people they should be serving rather than exploiting. PCVs who have served in Africa and other developing countries often despair of what has happened in countries in which we worked and truly loved. Why Stop at Vengeance tells us this story again.

During the course of the novel Don and Tim suffer some similar fates of LGBT people in Uganda including arson and intimidation.  But true to form Don and Tim come through another adventure in Albany. May they continue to live the challenges and celebrations of our times.

Lipez (Stevenson) recommends the ironically titled 2014 documentary film, God Loves Uganda

Might I also add the documentary Call Me Kuchu, which highlights the life and death of Ugandan LGBT activist, David Kato.

Print and Kindle editions of Why Stop at Vengeance, MLR Press, are available on Amazon

The author, Dick Lipez, can be contacted at

Survey of LGBT RPCV Followers

LGBT Follower Survey 2015To take the pulse of what LGBT RPCV followers think about our mostly virtual organization, a survey was announced through our listserv as well as via Facebook and Twitter. Seventy-seven (77) people responded to the short survey (12% of our listserv membership).

Of the 77 respondents, just over 80% are returned Peace Corps volunteers (RPCVs), with about 13% being current volunteers.

The feature of our organization most appreciated is the listserv (62.5%) followed by Facebook (51.4%) and our webpage (37.5%).

For the listserv, the top 2 postings appreciated are Learning about Peace Corps-related news and events (73.5%) and LGBT world news (67.7%). Also appreciated were learning about job postings (38.2%) and countries of assignment (30.9%).  65.7% of respondents judged that the number of listserv postings is about right, with 22.4% saying there are too many posts and 11.9% too few. When asked how we can improve the listserv, the top suggestion was to consolidate the postings into either a daily or weekly summary to cut down on the frequency of posts, and possibly including questions for discussion about the posted issues. Many suggested adding more stories of LGBT PCVs and RPCVs and to include links to all that is posted, although a current PCV asked for the opposite: to post full articles since Internet service is weak and opening links can be a challenge. A few comments commended what we are now doing.

On the mentoring program, 58.2% of respondents didn’t know such a program existed, but would be interested in participating. Very few had participated in the program either as a mentor or mentee. The few notable comments were that people had tried to participate but were never contacted and that it may be worth considering having current volunteers mentor one another. It was also suggested that RPCVs who had served in specific countries could be made available to share their experiences with those who may be going to those countries.

Key suggestions to improve the Facebook group, Twitter posts and our webpage were to close the Facebook page because having it open to the public may compromise current volunteers where host country nationals can see that they are members and to increase the number of job posts.

Other things that followers would like to see LGBT RPCV doing that would be useful:

  • Enable more connections among RPCVs such as organizing more local and regional events of interest to LGBT RPCVs, including social events and job fairs and pride events.
  • Make links to more external groups that share similar interests to ours, including working with US-based LGBT organizations to support projects.
  • Make more efforts to reach potential PCVs.
  • Explore having RPCVs visit current LGBT PCVs.

When asked about interest in becoming more involved in LGBT RPCV in leading our community, 9 people stepped forward with their contact information. No one had a specific idea about what they wanted to volunteer to do, but one respondent who has already been very active noted that he has taken part in LGBT RPCV events such as Pride celebrations and Peace Corps anniversary occasions. He said that he is “proud of our organization and its ongoing supportive involvement in Peace Corps. I consider my own service as a pivotal point in my own life that keeps me closely connected… Surely PC’s own evolving comfort and active support of LGBT volunteers has much in our organization’s existence and work…”

LGBT Follower Survey 2015

2014 – The Year of Connectivity for the LGBT Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Organization

2014 was the Year of Connectivity for the LGBT Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Organization as we continued to reach people through our website, our Facebook page, our Yahoo! Groups list, and Twitter. Here is a overview of our connected presence.


We have had a web presence since the mid-1990s and have published hundreds of stories from queer volunteers and their friends about the countries where they serve; about what life is like back in the states; or about new adventures since the Peace Corps. Our website is hosted at and currently contains almost 225 timely articles from 50 countries ranging from Albania to Zimbabwe. You can follow new publications on our website and we welcome comments online. If you follow your news on a blog reader (RSS) the newsfeed URL for our website is We average about 100 visitors day.

Website visitors

We had close to 22,000 visitors in 2014.

Most of our most popular posts in 2014 were written before 2014, indicating that our information remains relevant and important to our readers.


Title Publication Date
1 Is There Gay Life in Benin? May 2006
2 Placing Same-Sex Couples in Peace Corps Ukraine February 2014
3 It’s Not that Bad in Paraguay April 2012
4 Queer Volunteer? What to Expect in Morocco March 2010
5 My Friends, the Fakaleitis of Tonga

November 2006

 LGBT Peace Corps on Facebook

Our fastest growing media presence is on our Facebook group at We now have over 237 members who are current and former volunteers, as well as friends of LGBT PC. Finds news, personal stories, job postings and the latest articles for our website here.


LGBT Returned Peace Corps Volunteers on Yahoo! Groups

Founded on December 31, 1998 is our Yahoo! Group at . This site requires a membership but it is easy to request by sending an email to The group currently hosts 631 members and averages 40 messages a month. Members post LGBT news from around the world, job listings, and seek advice on countries of service. This is our most important tool for mentoring volunteers about to enter service so if you have a question join in the conversation.


LGBT Peace Corps on Twitter

Lastly we host a Twitter Feed at Over the last quarter of 2014 our Tweets had 12,700 views, with an average of 140 per day.

Our most popular tweet of that period was about our very own steering committee member, Manuel Colon with 787 views. .


United Through the Wire – Our Organization Thrives in a Digital World

– Kevin H. Souza, Returned Peace Corps Volunteer, Malawi

The key to maintaining volunteer organizations is creating self-sustaining practices and this has been the approach of the LGBT Peace Corps group for the last few years, particularly in the area of communication. Our communication strategy consist of a wordpress website, a discussion group hosted by Yahoo Groups, a Facebook group and a Twitter account.


We have had a web presence since the mid-1990s and have published hundreds of stories from queer volunteers and their friends about the countries where they serve, about what life is like back in the states or about new adventures since the Peace Corps. Our website is hosted at and currently contains almost 200 timely articles from 48 countries ranging from Albania to Zimbabwe. You can follow new publications on our website and we welcome comments online. If you follow your news on a blog reader (RSS) the newsfeed URL for our website is

The website averages about 100 visits a day from almost every country in the world. Our most popular articles of all time are:

  1. The Life of a Transgender PCV: Are you a Boy or a Girl by Bryce Wolfe

  2. Open Secrets – Serving Queer in Paraguay – Compiled and Edited by Manuel Colón and Fiona Martin

  3. Building My Own Closet in Paraguay – by Fiona Martin

  4. Is There Gay Life in Benin? – by a former volunteer

  5. It’s Not That Bad in Paraguay  – by Manuel Colón

Online Discussion Group at Yahoo! Groups

Our Yahoo! Groups listserv at has attracted 655 members since January 27, 1999 and inspired 4192 messages. It is one of the richest sources of information on queer issues in Peace Corps service and the full archive is easily searchable. In the archive you will find 170 postings on Malawi, 145 on Russia, 126 on China, and 79 on Mongolia – just to scratch the surface. To search the archives or join the conversation you can subscribe at


Our fastest growing community is found on Facebook at with more than 145 members and growing daily. Discussions similar to our Yahoo! Groups are found here with postings from potential applicants, recently placed applicants and former volunteers sharing advice and stories about life as a queer volunteer in the Peace Corps. Recent discussions have included service in Columbia, Uganda, and Russia. You will also find information on Peace Corps events and interesting polls from our members. Boasting active members of Peace Corps it is also a great place to track new policy, advocacy and opportunity.


Finally, our group has a presence on Twitter. You can follow us at Like Facebook, our Twitter community is growing fast with over 145 followers and posts that encourage local get-togethers, highlight volunteers and queer Peace Corps employees around the country.

The easiest way to be a part of our community is join in the discussion. You have many options depending on your favored way of communicating. Lets us hear from you.

For questions or comments about our communications strategies contact


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